Category: The Wall


by Jamshyd Osman

The house is empty
Heart’s gone cold
The mantel’s gone dusty
Littered with spider webs & mold

An unusual feeling
Unwanted, Deserted
Involuntary tears
Of disgust & anguish
Guilt stuck at the throat
Another chance, another wish

Weaving tales of sorrow
A wasteful pastime
Bitter nothingness of tomorrow
No rhymes no smile

An oddity of emotion
Can’t dare to share
Errors in their judgment
Makes the truth look bare

Once these halls echoed laughter
Bore witness to joy
Nights & mornings after
Playing wild, playing coy

The romance of monsoon
Blessings after the gloom
Moments becoming hours
Tending to beds of flowers

We owe it all to Thee
That window of glee
I‘m glad that had to be
Both the bitter & the sweet
Wouldn’t have ventured any other street

Yesterday created today
Here now silence can only prevail
Echoes of yester-steps
Landmarks stay still as memoirs appear
Like an oasis in another hemisphere

Feels like a grave
Inside these heavy & lonely
Four walls

by Noam Chomsky
February 23, 2004

 

It is a virtual reflex for governments to plead security concerns when they undertake any controversial action, often as a pretext for something else. Careful scrutiny is always in order. Israel’s so-called security fence, which is the subject of hearings starting today at the International Court of Justice in The Hague, is a case in point.

Few would question Israel’s right to protect its citizens from terrorist attacks like the one yesterday, even to build a security wall if that were an appropriate means. It is also clear where such a wall would be built if security were the guiding concern: inside Israel, within the internationally recognized border, the Green Line established after the 1948-49 war. The wall could then be as forbidding as the authorities chose: patrolled by the army on both sides, heavily mined, impenetrable. Such a wall would maximize security, and there would be no international protest or violation of international law.

This observation is well understood. While Britain supports America’s opposition to The Hague hearings, its foreign minister, Jack Straw, has written that the wall is “unlawful.” Another ministry official, who inspected the “security fence,” said it should be on the Green Line or “indeed on the Israeli side of the line.” A British parliamentary investigative commission also called for the wall to be built on Israeli land, condemning the barrier as part of a “deliberate” Israeli “strategy of bringing the population to heel.” Continue reading